How do you find a critique group?

Last week when I wrote about how to tell when your novel is done, I mentioned my critique group and their reactions to my manuscript. You may have noticed other authors talking about their groups or thanking them on the acknowledgements pages of their published books. And you may be thinking: I don’t have a group, I have no idea how to get one, and it’s lonely out here.

I hear you. Good critique groups are not easy to find, especially if you live out in the boonies like I do. If you happen to be in a college creative writing program or taking a workshop, you might have a chance to critique each other’s work, but that’s only a temporary fix, and these might not even be the people you want to have reading your work. The ideal critique group is long-lasting, local, and small enough that every writer gets the attention he or she needs, but big enough to offer varied opinions. The members share a similar level of skill and experience, and they understand what you’re trying to do with your writing. They stick to a regular schedule and a consistent process that works.

How do you find such a group? That’s where networking comes in. Most writers would rather just write. Too bad. There are many steps between the writer and reading world, and you need other people to get there. Here’s what you do:

* Join a local or regional writing organization. Here in Oregon, I belong to Willamette Writers and Writers on the Edge. We also have Oregon Writers Colony. In California, I belonged to the California Writers Club, which has branches all over the state. Most states have their own writing organizations. A quick Internet search will surely find you a group. You can find a great list of genre-specific groups at http://www.writersrelief.com/writers-associations-organizations.

* Go to writing events. Look for readings, open mics, workshops and conferences where you can meet other writers.

* Get involved. Join the board, volunteer, offer to bring cookies, read your work at the open mic, talk to people. Writers are inherently shy, but if you get yourself an official job to do, it’s a lot easier to meet people.

* Ask people about critique groups. Do they know of one that could use another member? Would they like to start one with you? If there’s a newsletter, submit a notice that you’re looking for a critique group. Our group was born one night before a Willamette Writers program when three of us were having dinner together and discovered we were all looking for a critique group. We set a date, started meeting, added a couple more members, and have been meeting every other Tuesday since then. When I lived in California, I was invited by a fellow member of California Writer’s Club to join her group.

Not every group succeeds. You may need to try different combinations of people. It helps if you’re all working on similar types of writing. In my group, we’re all doing novels or memoirs right now. Another group I know does nothing but poetry. And you need to set up a process. Where and when will you meet? Will you read passages out loud or distribute copies before the meeting? Our group sends up to 10 pages by email a few days before the meeting so members arrive having already read and marked up their copies. We go clockwise around the table giving our comments while the author listens and takes notes. We talk about what works and what doesn’t and about where the story is going. We discuss issues like flashbacks, point of view and plot. It’s painful when a friend says, “No, this section doesn’t work,” but it makes our work much stronger in the long run.

It’s not essential to meet in person. You can exchange critiques around the world by computer, adding comments and corrections with the “track changes” function in Word. You could even meet via Skype or Google Hangout. You can also join existing online critique sites such as the Critique Circle, where you earn critiques for your work by commenting on other members’ work. I belonged for a long time, and it was helpful. But there’s something about meeting face to face, working through the pages of your work together, that really does make it stronger.

We writers would like to think we don’t need anyone else. But we do. We cannot be objective about our own work, and we will never see it as a reader sees it. We need a critique group.

But of course there’s nothing to critique until you write it.

So now go write.


You can’t buy a writing career

Did you know that writing is big business? Not actually writing itself but selling stuff to people who want to be writers. I don’t think anyone could count all the services and products being marketed to wanna-be writers. So many. They’ll help you sell your stories, publish your books, build your platform, get organized, jump over writer’s block, and tell you how to write. They all seem to promise that if you just buy their products and follow directions, like baking a cake, you will have the books, the fame, and the money. But they can’t guarantee it. Most of the people who buy these things don’t get all the goodies. They don’t become full-time writers. I don’t want to discourage you, but what you really need to become a success writer doesn’t cost a lot of money but it does take effort, time, and faith.

First, you have to write well. Not only must your writing be grammatically correct, with proper spelling, but it has to say something original, something that is not just a copy of everything already published. It has to touch or help people in some way. It has to have substance, details, more than just what you pour out of your head. A million would-be writing coaches tell you to write every day, but they don’t tell you what to write or how to write it. You need to learn and practice the craft of writing. Take classes, read books, join a critique group or find a friend who will tell you the truth about where your writing works and where it doesn’t. And keep writing, even when you don’t have somebody prompting you to do it. That’s what makes you a writer.

Start with an idea, add information and thought, write it out, and revise it, revise it, revise it.

And yes, you need to market, to offer your stuff to appropriate editors in appropriate formats over and over again. Sure, there are books, magazines and blogs that will tell you how to do this, but it’s all the same information. Once you have learned the process, you just have to keep doing it. You will be rejected more often than not. Revise it again and send it back out.

Writing is like dieting. You can’t do it for a week or two then go back to living on burgers, fries and Coca-Cola. It has to become a lifestyle. No one can guarantee that you will become rich and famous. But if you write well and keep sending your work out, you will have some success. You will be published. You will be a writer.

Every time somebody offers to sell you something to help you be a writer, be suspicious. Ask yourself if you really need it and if they’re just in it for the money. Sometimes a product or service can help you work better or inspire you when you’re feeling blocked, but in the end what you really need to be a writer is hard work and persistence, something you can’t buy.

End of sermon. Go write something good.