The Writer Aid Blog is Moving On

Dear writers, you might notice that I haven’t been posting here lately. Or maybe you haven’t noticed, which is the point of today’s post. I have decided to discontinue the Writer Aid blog. I will keep the past posts, resource list, and information about my editing and coaching services online, but the weekly posts will cease. I will continue to publish writing-related content in other publications and occasionally on my Unleashed in Oregon site, but as a few publishers have said to me over the years, this blog just doesn’t “pencil out” anymore.

A quick Google search shows an endless list of  blogs and newsletters for writers. Every writer wants to publish a blog about writing. Nobody can read them all and still get any writing done. The best blogs and newsletters are produced by people who dedicate themselves to that work. Me, I’m scattered all over, with three blogs, a website, Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads. I’m working on projects in poetry, fiction and nonfiction, as well as maintaining a music career. I have enjoyed sharing my insights about writing here and at the Everything But Writing site that preceded it, but it has been 10 years, and it’s time to move on.

You will not be without resources. Let me recommend some of my favorite sites to check out:

Every year, in the May issue, Writer’s Digest publishes 101 Best Websites for Writers. If you can’t find something there, you’re not trying. Visit http://www.writersidigest.com

Here’s a list from The Positive Writer of top writing blogs that I totally agree with. Click on the links there for advice and inspiration that will keep you writing for years.

At Funds for Writers, C.Hope Clark inspires writers with her articles and extensive lists of contests, funding sources, and publishing opportunities. There’s a free newsletter, as well as a paid version with more listings.

I just found this amazing list at newpages.com of blogs by poets and writers. I could spend weeks reading these blogs.

And poets, Diane Lockward’s poetry newsletter never fails to teach me something and get my pen moving. Click on the link and scroll down to subscribe.

There are more. So many more.

It’s hard to say goodbye, so I won’t. I’m still here. You can reach me at sufalick@gmail.com or come say hi to me on Facebook.

Now, let’s go write.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Get Inspired with These Writing Books

I’m always reading books about writing. Here are a couple I have finished recently.

The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop by Diane Lockward, Wind Publications, 2013. I may have talked about this book two years ago when I first started working my way through it, but I’ve got to mention it again now that I’ve made it to the last page. This book is fantastic. On days when I had no ideas, I turned to The Crafty Poet and never came away disappointed. Lockward has filled this book with poems, prompts and essays by poets about their craft. The poems themselves are wonderful, but we’re encouraged to use them as springboards for our own work, using some of the same techniques. The exercise I just finished offered a poem with no punctuation or capitalization. I had never written such a poem, but trying it made me feel so free I plan to do it again. Other prompts work with places, sounds, word, line breaks and much more. I’m not sure what I’m going to do now that I have finished this book. I may have to go back to page one and start again. Lockward offers a great poetry newsletter at dianelockward.blogspot.com. I also recommend her books of poetry. I’m currently reading What Feeds Us and loving it.

The Art of Memoir by Mary Karr, HarperCollins, 2015. This is the book all my memoir-writing friends are rushing to read this year.  Having read and loved Mary Karr’s memoirs—The Liars’ Club, Cherry, Lit–I expected to love this book. She has received mostly five-star reviews on Goodreads, so maybe I’m just cranky. It is a good book, inspiring and educational, like a master class in the memoir, but I felt handicapped reading it because I haven’t read all the memoirs that she discusses in depth. It was like trying to pass a literature course without doing the homework. Future readers, check the table of contents and read the works mentioned there, as well as Karr’s memoirs. Then you will be prepared for the in-depth analysis in this book. I had expected a how-to for writers, but this is more an exploration of the memoir genre. However, Karr does offer considerable advice about voice and revision, truth and memory, and dealing with family and friends. If you’re a Karr fan, read this, but do your homework first.

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About this blog: I have been doing this blog under various names for eight years, compiling almost 400 posts. Combine that with columns I have written elsewhere, and I think it’s time for me to put together another writing book. What do you think? Would you be interested?

Meanwhile, time is zooming by. Let’s go write.